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PAX East 2014 and Boston Photos

This year, I went to Boston to check out PAX East for the first time. Here are my photos below.

The inn room I stayed at.

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The long line at Boston’s ramen shop named Yume wo Kakare and the buta ramen (with garlic and vegatables) I ate there.

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Now for PAX East 2014:

IMG_1235 IMG_1236 IMG_1237 IMG_1238 IMG_1239 IMG_1240 IMG_1242 IMG_1243 IMG_1244 IMG_1245 IMG_1246 IMG_1247 IMG_1249 IMG_1250 IMG_1252 IMG_1253 IMG_1254 IMG_1255

Leaving Boston for home:

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For my next trip to another PAX, I plan to get my own booth to show off my games.

My bonus cover photo:

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Global Game Jam 2014 Submission: Monk’s Journey

At this year’s Global Game Jam, I chose to develop a game at Cipher Prime because I usually hang out there almost every week. Also, I teamed up with the a bunch of strangers to seek new challenges. The only lesson I learned there as a frequent game jammer is that I should bring my own large notebook/sketchbook to write down my plan in case there is no whiteboard.

Anyway, our game is called Monk’s Journey.
monksjourney_featured

Here are the links related to my group’s game submission:

Global Game Jam page:
http://globalgamejam.org/2014/games/monks-journey
Web Player:
http://www.danielhjung.com/projects/MonksJourney/MonksJourney_Web.html
Download (Win/OS X/Linux):
http://www.danielhjung.com/projects/MonksJourney/MonksJourney.zip

Philly Game Jam 2013 Entry: Ghost Blasters

Hey people, my game jam team Space Lords have created a game within 43 hours at Philly Game Jam 2013 called Ghost Blasters. We didn’t win any awards at this time, but we enjoyed what we’ve been doing anyway.

Ghost Blasters

Timelapse:

Here are the links to the game according to platform:

Download Windows Version
Download OS X Version

Hope you guys enjoy playing this game!

Experiment: MonoGame for Ouya for First Time

Recently, I ordered Ouya at Amazon.com to try developing for it (and play Towerfall). So far, everything about the hardware and its included software are okay. My main complaint is that it doesn’t have a huge library of worth-playing games. Well, Ouya is still in its infancy. It may take a while before there are more cool games out. I’ll try making games for it after I finish my own research & development for Ouya. Okay, enough about Ouya itself. My main purpose for writing this post is to talk about my experience with developing a test app for Ouya.

Before I started developing for Ouya, I followed the setup instructions in the documentation at Ouya’s developer site. All I had to do was install the necessary packages in Android SDK Manager and manually add Ouya to the list of USB devices in a hidden file. In case if I make updates to the SDK, I would have to manually add Ouya to the list again.

My first attempt at Ouya development is through compiling and testing MonoGame examples. The included examples are In-App Purchases, SetResolutions and VirtualController. I decided to compile them on my Mac partition. My only choice of IDE so far is Xamarin Studio, since I read that the current MonoGame for MonoDevelop template package does not work on MonoDevelop 4.x. Before I can compile them, I needed these following things: ODK Bindings in C#, Xamarin.Android (already included in Xamarin Studio, but I must log in to my account), and MonoGame source code in GitHub (had to compile this into .Net assembly). So far, I encountered minor issues. One particular issue I found out was that KeyEventArgs property is not available in the current (develop) version of MonoGame framework. I encountered a compile-time error when I tried to build SetResolutions application. However, when I tried linking to pre-built MonoGame framework assembly that was included in the In-App Purchases project folder, I compiled the program successfully. It seems the developers of MonoGame have decided to remove KeyEventArgs from the latest version for some reason. I could have gone with the master version in their repository, but that doesn’t contain the framework for Ouya. I might have to suck it up with their latest development version anyway.

My second Ouya development attempt is by writing and compiling my own “first game” from scratch. This project only consists of one phrase using a font I borrowed from one of the examples. When I compiled the program for the first time, I did not encounter any compile-time errors. However, when I ran it, my application threw an exception and terminated itself. So, I spent a long time trying to resolve this issue by tweaking the code multiple times. But, my program still threw the same exception. Sometime around the last minute, I took a peek at my project file’s options. I found that my project was using Android 2.1 SDK, which it shouldn’t. Therefore, I changed it to Android 4.1, the version Ouya runs on. When I recompiled and ran the application, it no longer threw an exception. I realize that MonoGame’s framework for Ouya may be incomplete. The people behind it probably forgot to correctly set the target SDK to version 4.1.

So far, I only touched the surface of MonoGame for Ouya development. I haven’t tried using my own content yet. Since MonoGame’s content pipeline is still under development as of now, I would have to use XNA Game Studio 4.0 to compile my assets to optimized and recognizable formats. I would have to switch to Windows partition in order to use XNA Game Studio.

Since there is going to be a Unity to Ouya tutorial at Cipher Prime Studios this Thursday, I will hold off on MonoGame stuff and jump to Unity for Ouya development as soon as possible to familiarize myself with it. I’ll see other Philly-based developers there. I’ll bring my Ouya too.

List of links to necessary pages for MonoGame for Ouya development:
https://devs.ouya.tv/
http://monogame.codeplex.com/
https://github.com/slygamer/ouya-csharp
http://xamarin.com/monoforandroid
https://github.com/mono/MonoGame
https://github.com/ouya/ouya-sdk-examples

Eleventh Day of My Japan Trip 2013

Okay, I decided to explore every last place I could check in one day. First, I decided to ride the Shinkansen to Yokohama to check out Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum.

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 1

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 2

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 3

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 4

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 5

Shin-Yokohama Ramen Museum 6

After I finished checking the museum and buying some souvenirs, I took the Shinkansen again to get to Osaka.

I took the local train to Namba to find an okonomiyaki restaurant named Fukutarou.

Namba 1

A sign says Fukutarou Main Restaurant

Fukutarou 1

When I got there, so many people were waiting there for hours. When there are so many Japanese people lined up, there is very good food there.

Fukutarou 2

When I finally got called in, I made my order and wondered whether I will be able to catch the Shinkansen back to Tokyo in time.

Fukutarou Okonomiyaki 1

Fukutarou Okonomiyaki 2

When I finished my meal and paid my bill, I immediately took the local train to Shin-Osaka Station. When I got there, I noticed the only Shinkansens left at the time I was there were Nozomi and Kodama. Kodama is the slowest since it stops at every station. So, I decided to buy a ticket for Nozomi train to get to Tokyo faster. Since my JR Pass doesn’t cover Nozomi and Mizuho trains, I had to pay the full fare of 13,240 yen.

Nozomi Ticket

There are so many things in Japan I wanted to check out badly. Unfortunately, my plane leaves on Friday in the afternoon. So, this will be my last Japan trip post until I write another. Until then, later.

My Tenth Day of Japan Trip 2013

When I got to Kyoto, I decided to stop at someplace to eat for lunch. Since Kyoto is in the Kansai area, I thought about trying the okonomiyaki here.

Kyoto Lunch 2

Kyoto Lunch 1

Other images in Kyoto Prefecture:

Kyoto 1

Kyoto 2

Kyoto 11

Kyoto 10

Kyoto 9

Kyoto 8

Kyoto 7

Kyoto 6

Kyoto 5

Kyoto 4

Kyoto 3

I initially planned to go to Osaka next, but I decided to just return to my hotel in Tokyo.

My first ramen dinner in Tokyo:

Tokyo Ramen

Now I need to my laundry.